To Main page


Return to Index Page
Home Page | Search
News Item Page6 to 10.
There are 35 News Items
Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next
Snippets 3 August 2005
Another Opal & Gem Festival gone and it was a busy time at the display. Photos of Bill the Buzzard have been presented amongst other tidbits of history. The Nettleton bronze was of great interest as was this year’s publication, ‘Opaladies, Stories in the Cultural Mosaic at Lightning Ridge.’ Thanks to everyone who supported the event and particularly the Society’s presentation. Creating an awareness of our colourful history is our purpose. Heritage Cottage will be open as usual this week. And members, don’t forget our meeting at 2pm on Sunday, August 7, on the back verandah.

Barbara Moritz, Secretary
27 March 2006 03:29am
Snippets 27 July 2005
Charlie Nettleton’s bronze marquette (small sculpture) by Brett Garling will be revealed at the Opal & Gem Festival this week. The strength of his half-figure pose is indicative of the strength of the black opal industry he founded in 1903 when he walked to White Cliffs and sold the first parcel. This is No.1 of the Limited Edition (20) to generate funds for casting a life-size bronze, a monument in Lightning Ridge to early opal miners. Dave Galman founded the Nettleton Fund in 2003.

A Nettleton bronze will look splendid on your desk or bookcase, on the bar or in your trophy case. When you visit the Society’s display, you will admire Garling’s transformation of Charlie into bronze. Owning a Nettleton Limited Edition is testimony of your belief in the industry and support of Lightning Ridge. For the person who has everything BUT – a bronze of Charlie! Remember ladies, Father’s Day is in September ….. See you at the Festival!

Barbara Moritz, Secretary

27 March 2006 03:29am
Snippets 20 July 2005
Duncan Dickson first came to the Ridge in 1962. He brought up the first blower, manufactured in Sydney, in about 1973. A died-in-the-wool Scot, he named her ‘Macgregor’s Bagpipe’! We have photos of this curious machine operating at the 10-Mile. Sons, Dougie and Angus, mined with their father, later next to the Galman Brothers at Pony Fence. The Dickson clan lived in Matrix Street across from Bower Bird Bob. Their dog Jack, a German shepherd, took charge of the neighbourhood. June and her daughters, Fiona, Moira and Jenny, kept house for the busy miners.

Moira Green, brought her daughter Tracey back to the Ridge from Maryborough in Queensland during the school holidays. She looked up a few old friends – from her own school days and those of her parents. She was impressed with the Central School complex and amazed at the changes in the place. Her mother, June, is 80 and lives with the Green family. Duncan died in Scotland in the 1990s. The Dickson sons live in Sydney and have film footage of the formulative years in the 1970s. With luck, we’ll have a chance to make copies for the local collection.

Barbara Moritz, Secretary
27 March 2006 03:28am
Snippets 14 July 2004
Mrs Mary Thorley was an opal cutter and lived at the 9-Mile in earlier years. Ted Dawson remembers her living over the Dooley in the village in the early 1920s, say about where Stan Davies lives in Harlequin Street. One funny story told on our oral history tapes is that Mrs Thorley went off to the Grawin with Jack Dungey for the 1926-29 rush. This day he returned to camp to find her keeping company with another. He was so angry that he kicked in the spokes of his OWN bicycle! We are unable to establish a connection to Philip and Bill, the Thorley cousins. Mary cut Billy Kite’s Pheasant stone in 1936 at the 9-Mile.

Barbara Moritz, Secretary

27 March 2006 03:28am
Snippets 6 July 2005
In early June, Thorley’s Rush was our subject. Stuart Lloyd in his book ‘Lightning Ridge’ says this field at the 6-Mile was found by Bill Thorley in 1907. Yet family history says Philip, also known as ‘Hoppy’ due to his gamy leg, found it and put it in the name of Bill. Family history also reports that Hoppy had a general store here. He died in Sydney in 1910. So who was Bill? We knew he was on the ridge in the early years as his name was written in the Regan Store register 1912-1922.

At last, Lyn Macdonald, with whom we had earlier correspondence in this regard, has solved the mystery and wonders why it didn’t dawn on her until now. Bill was born Cyrus Thorley, a teamster in the area from 1903 into the 1920s, and he was Lyn’s grandfather. So, the Thorley men are first cousins. Hoppy’s great-grandson, Bruce, will be impressed with our discoveries when he next visits the Ridge. He is still looking for the photograph he remembers of Hoppy with a Chinaman in front of the general store. The saga continues.

Barbara Moritz, Secretary
27 March 2006 03:27am