To Main page


Return to Index Page
Home Page | Search
News Item Page26 to 30.
There are 35 News Items
Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next
Snippets 17 March 2005
The Bruce family came to Lightning Ridge in 1908 and lived at Nettleton on 3-Mile flat. Edith Rebecca, later known as 'Granny Bruce', came from a large family. Her brother, Jim Thompson, also settled on the opal fields and three of his children appear on the school attendance list at Nettleton, 1910, as well as the Bruce kids. Another brother, Alfred Thompson, was a carpenter and travelled the outback working his trade. He and his family also lived at Nettleton in 1910 before moving on to Moree. His great grandson, Steve Buckley, perused his aunt's postcard collection to put together the family history. He discovered evidence of his family's presence at Lightning Ridge. Portraits of his grandmother, Annie Thompson, and other views give us a glimpse into early 3-Mile life. Conlin's Store relatives are also expecting to be on hand when Steve brings his father and aunt, Annie's surviving children, to dedicate the Annie Thompson Collection. Please mark your calendars with this special event on Good Friday - March 25, 10.30 a.m. - at the opening of Heritage Cottage Hospital Gallery. You'll enjoy the step back in time!

Barbara Moritz, Secretary
27 March 2006 01:13am
Snippets 10 March 2005
A late May 2004 Snippets reported the visit of Celia Denis Hull, who lived in Lightning Ridge in the 1930s. She had returned in 1969 to discover that the old family home built by her father ‘Son’ Denis in 1934 was occupied by the infamous Harold Hodges, founder of the Tram-o-tel. In those days, the trams were situated from Agate Street behind today’s chemist and the Anglican Church nearly to Onyx Street. Hodges lived on the now vacant block beside the CTC in Morilla Street. Celia was amazed at Ridge development and promised to roust out photos from the 1930s for the Society’s collection. True to her word, we have received 100 snaps with text descriptions in an album donated to the town in memory of the Denis family. ‘Big Jim’ Denis brought his family to the opal fields in 1905. His only son Jim ‘Son’ was Celia’s father spent his life in the district as a shearer and timber cutter. His portable mill provided lumber for local constructions including the second Anglican Church built in 1935. This building has been relocated and restored as St George’s Serbian Orthodox Church. The Denis photo collection covers 100 years, even snaps of the great-great-great grandchildren of ‘Big Jim’ and Cecelia, a popular and industrious couple in our early history. Learn more about local history and join the Historical Society. We’re holding a general meeting on Sunday, 13 March, at 2pm on the back verandah.

Barbara Moritz, Secretary
27 March 2006 01:13am
Snippets 3 March 2005
The Jenkins were a popular couple and were later invited by Ridge miners to take black opal to the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley in 1925. Their display in Australia’s Pavilion was of great interest and did much to promote black opal in England. Elsie & Hector shared a life-long interest in minerals and gems and left NSW for the Harz Ranges in the late 1920s. When you visit Heritage Cottage Hospital Gallery you will see photos and a copy of the certificate of participation in the Wembley Exhibition issued to Hector Jenkins. Elsie’s family have also donated an oil painting of 1920s mining to the town for our enjoyment and for posterity. The gallery reopens Good Friday. Please remember the Historical Society general meeting to be held on 13 March, Sunday afternoon at 2pm. on the back verandah. We welcome new members!

Barbara Moritz, Secretary
27 March 2006 01:12am
Snippets 23 February 2005
Probably the only qualified gemmologist on the opal fields in the early years was Hector Jenkins. He travelled eastern Australia presenting gemstone exhibitions at Shows and gatherings. That’s where he met Elsie, a wonderful horsewoman and the Best Hack and Hunter in 1915. They arrived in 1918 to mine on the 3-Mile but gradually went into buying when they realized the need. Jack Souter was their regular mining partner. Motorcars was another passion the Jenkins shared, and their Ford held pride of place at the camp. In 1923, they took a camping holiday to Tasmania, selling opal in Melbourne enroute. Three young emus and the dog went too. The write-up in the papers was complete with photo of them with their ‘travelling tucker’ strapped to the side of the Ford, a freshly shot kangaroo! ..continued next week

Barbara Moritz, Secretary
27 March 2006 01:12am
Snippets 16 February 2005
So, it was through Nettleton’s experience at White Cliffs that guided Murray and him to an established opal buyer for appraisal of this unfamiliar nodular black opal. It took some doing to establish it in the world’s market place, and Wollaston held a large personal investment for a few years until his efforts came to fruition. England and America were major buyers before WWI. In the meantime, Murphy made his first visit to the Ridge in 1905, and again, before finally relocating with his wife to Lightning Ridge, 450 miles to the east, in 1907. His son Ned and family followed. In 1911, the Murphys Sr. relocated to Sydney and bought The Black Opal Store in George Street. The former owner, Theo Lorenz, came to the 3-Mile. He was a lapidarist and champion doublet maker.


Barbara Moritz, Secretary
27 March 2006 01:11am